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Security Features of the New Bank of Japan Notes

August 23, 2004
Bank of Japan

The new Bank of Japan notes will be issued beginning November 1, 2004.
The security features of the new 10,000 yen note, 5,000 yen note, and 1,000 yen note are explained below. The Bank of Japan advises the public to familiarize themselves with these security features.

New 10,000 yen note (Front)

New 10,000 yen note (Back)

Security features of the current 10,000 yen note:

  1. Watermark
  2. Ultrafine-line printing
  3. Intaglio printing
  4. Microprinting
  5. Luminescent ink

Security features of the new 10,000 yen note:

(1) Hologram

When the banknote is tilted, the color and pattern of the design change.

(2) Watermark-bar-pattern

When the banknote is held up to the light, three vertical watermark bars (two bars for the 5,000 yen note, one for the 1,000 yen note) become visible. This feature is more difficult to reproduce with personal computers or color copiers than the traditional watermark.

(3) Latent image

When the banknote is viewed from a certain angle, the number "10000"appears on the bottom left of the front side, and the word "NIPPON" ("Japan" in Japanese) on the top right of the back side.

(4) Pearl ink

When viewed from different angles, a semi-transparent pattern printed with pink pearl ink appears in the blank areas of the left and right margins of the front of the note.

(5) Microprinting

Like notes issued since December 1, 1993 (with serial numbers in brown), the new 10,000 yen note has the words "NIPPON GINKO" ("Bank of Japan" in Japanese) printed in micro letters. Some of the micro letters are made even smaller on the new note than those on the current note. Also, micro letters of different sizes are included in the background design.

(6) Luminescent ink

As in notes issued since December 1, 1993 (with serial numbers in brown), the Governor's seal on the front side glows orange under ultraviolet light. Likewise, some parts of the background pattern fluoresce yellowish-green.

(7) Intaglio printing

Raised printing is used for some features of the new note. The ink on the new note is raised higher than the ink on the current note.

(8) Tactile marks (intaglio printing)

To assist the visually impaired in detecting the note by touch, a recognition symbol with a rougher texture, printed intaglio, is adopted instead of the watermark symbols used for the current note.

New 5,000 yen note (Front)

New 5,000 yen note (Back)

Security features of the current 5,000 yen note:

  1. Watermark
  2. Ultrafine-line printing
  3. Intaglio printing
  4. Microprinting
  5. Luminescent ink

Security features of the new 5,000 yen note:

(1) Hologram

When the banknote is tilted, the color and pattern of the design change.

(2) Watermark-bar-pattern

When the banknote is held up to the light, two vertical watermark bars (three bars for the 10,000 yen note, one for the 1,000 yen note) become visible. This feature is more difficult to reproduce with personal computers or color copiers than the traditional watermark.

(3) Latent image

When the banknote is viewed from a certain angle, the number "5000"appears on the center bottom of the front side, and the word "NIPPON" ("Japan" in Japanese) on the right in the middle of the back side.

(4) Pearl ink

When viewed from different angles, a semi-transparent pattern printed with pink pearl ink appears in the blank areas of the left and right margins of the front of the note.

(5) Microprinting

Like notes issued since December 1, 1993 (with serial numbers in brown), the new 5,000 yen note has the words "NIPPON GINKO" ("Bank of Japan" in Japanese) printed in micro letters. Some of the micro letters are made even smaller on the new note than those on the current note. Also, micro letters of different sizes are included in the background design.

(6) Luminescent ink

As in notes issued since December 1, 1993 (with serial numbers in brown), the Governor's seal on the front side glows orange under ultraviolet light. Likewise, some parts of the background pattern fluoresce yellowish-green.

(7) Intaglio printing

Raised printing is used for some features of the new note. The ink on the new note is raised higher than the ink on the current note.

(8) Tactile marks (intaglio printing)

To assist the visually impaired in detecting the note by touch, a recognition symbol with a rougher texture, printed intaglio, is adopted instead of the watermark symbols used for the current note.

New 1,000 yen note (Front)

New 1,000 yen note (Back)

Security features of the current 1,000 yen note:

  1. Watermark
  2. Ultrafine-line printing
  3. Intaglio printing
  4. Microprinting
  5. Luminescent ink

Security features of the new 1,000 yen note:

(1) Latent pearl image

A security feature unique to the new 1,000 yen note. When the banknote is tilted, you can see (1) the Japanese characters meaning "1,000 yen" printed with pearl ink, and (2) the number "1000" as a latent image.

(2) Watermark-bar-pattern

When the banknote is held up to the light, a vertical watermark bar (three bars for the 10,000 yen note, two for the 5,000 yen note) becomes visible. This feature is more difficult to reproduce with personal computers or color copiers than the traditional watermark.

(3) Latent image

When the banknote is viewed from a certain angle, the word "NIPPON" ("Japan" in Japanese) appears on the top right of the back side.

(4) Pearl ink

When viewed from different angles, a semi-transparent pattern printed with pink pearl ink appears in the blank areas of the left and right margins of the front of the note.

(5) Microprinting

Like notes issued since December 1, 1993 (with serial numbers in brown or dark green), the new 1,000 yen note has the words "NIPPON GINKO" ("Bank of Japan" in Japanese) printed in micro letters. Some of the micro letters are made even smaller on the new note than those on the current note. Also, micro letters of different sizes are included in the background design.

(6) Luminescent ink

As in notes issued since December 1, 1993 (with serial numbers in brown or dark green), the Governor's seal on the front side glows orange under ultraviolet light. Likewise, some parts of the background pattern fluoresce yellowish-green.

(7) Intaglio printing

Raised printing is used for some features of the new note. The ink on the new note is raised higher than the ink on the current note.

(8) Tactile marks (intaglio printing)

To assist the visually impaired in detecting the note by touch, a recognition symbol with a rougher texture, printed intaglio, is adopted instead of the watermark symbols used for the current note.

Note: Features (3) to (8) of each new note are already incorporated in the 2,000 yen notes.

Major Law Provisions

It is a punishable offense to make or knowingly use counterfeit Bank of Japan notes. The same applies to alteration of genuine Bank of Japan notes, including alteration of their face value.

Counterfeiting currency/altering genuine currency:
Penal servitude for life or not less than three years
(Article 148, Paragraph 1 of the Criminal Code of Japan)

Use of counterfeited/altered currency:
Penal servitude for life or not less than three years
(Article 148, Paragraph 2 of the Criminal Code of Japan)

Should you discover a suspicious Bank of Japan note, please report the matter to a nearby police station or the Bank of Japan immediately.